LECTURES, COURSES, WORKSHOP

Public Programme 2017-2018

 

ONLINE PAYMENT FOR EVENTS

You can pay online for Foundation events by credit card via PayPal. PayPal is the most secure and commonly used international payment process. You DO NOT have to be a PayPal subscriber, but can simply use a major credit card. If you pay online in advance of the event, you will receive the discounted price as shown below. If you prefer, you can still pay by cash or cheque.

 

2017

EVENTS IN TORONTO


Reading and Discussion Group

Margaret Meredith
Conversations on the Journey FULL. REGISTRATION CLOSED
Wed., Sep. 27, Nov. 8, Jan. 31, Feb. 28, Mar. 28,
Apr. 25
7-9pm

A reading and discussion group concentrating on the book Man and his Symbols (conceived and edited by Jung with contributions from Marie-Louise von Franz, J.L. Henderson, Jolande Jacobi, and Aniela Jaffé). New York: Doubleday and Company, 1964.

$120 IN ADVANCE for the series. must register for the series
FULL. REGISTRATION CLOSED

Lecture at 14 Elm

Robert Black
Dreams for the Ages
Fri., Sept. 29
7-9pm

A dream can have a major impact on all subsequent human life, for example, that of Frederick Banting on October 31, 1920 in London, Ontario, which led to the discovery of insulin. There are many others. This presentation looks at the meaningfulness of personal dreams at the collective level, some drawn from history, some from C.G. Jung’s analytical practice and others from local analysts. A dream perspective “for the ages” may not be a common one, but at times it seems to be suggested by the dream itself. Topics to be raised will include conventional religiosity versus raw spirituality — faith seen very pointedly through the lens of the unconscious — and the present and potential courses of our internet-grounded culture.

MEMBERS: $20 IN ADVANCE OR AT THE DOOR
SUSTAINING MEMBERS: FREE
NON MEMBERS: $20 IN ADVANCE; $25 AT THE DOOR
Or register and pay by mail.

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Seminar

Mary Tomlinson
Jung’s Word Association Experiment
Sun., Oct. 29
10am-12:30pm

Jung became interested in developing and testing his Word Association Experiment (WAE) early in his career while he was working at the Burgholzli hospital in Zurich. In fact, this work provided much of the impetus towards the first meeting between Freud and Jung who felt that it showed proof of the existence of complexes. Since then, the WAE has been found to be a useful tool that helps identify and measure our complexes or ‘hot spots’ via spontaneous, timed responses to 100 trigger words. It actually forms the basis of today’s lie detector test. The WAE lifts a veil to your complexes that you can’t necessarily approach directly. It yields hidden clues by making its way around a person’s defenses. It can be thought of as the mirror that Perseus used to cut off the head of the rageful Medusa without ever having to look directly at her.

$25 IN ADVANCE; $30 AT THE DOOR
Or register and pay by mail

Seminar CANCELLED

Graham Jackson
The Shadow in Film
Sat., Nov. 4, 10am-1pm
Sat., Nov. 11, 10am- 2pm


A revisiting of Jung’s concept of the Shadow with the help of two Italian films: Pier Paolo Pasolini’s Teorema, which deals with a mysterious stranger who arrives in a bourgeois household and creates mayhem; and Bertolucci’s The Conformist depicting the extremes a man will go to in order to escape his shadow.

CANCELLED

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Seminar

Roger LaRade
Angkor: Architecture of the Archetypes
Sat., Dec. 2
10am-12:30pm

UNESCO describes Angkor, in Cambodia’s northern province of Siem Rep, thus: “…one of the most important architectural sites of Southeast Asia. It extends over approximately 400 square kilometres and consists of scores of temples, hydraulic structures … as well as communication routes…. Temples such as Angkor Wat, the Bayon, Preah Khan and Ta Prohm, exemplars of Khmer architecture, are closely linked to their geographical context as well as being imbued with symbolic significance. Angkor is therefore a major site exemplifying cultural, religious and symbolic values, as well as containing high architectural, archaeological and artistic significance.”

Topics: Comparative religion, archetypes, mandala symbolism, Hindu, Buddhist, and Cambodian religious practice

$25 IN ADVANCE; $30 AT THE DOOR
Or register and pay by mail

 

 

2018

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Seminar

Robert Black
The Collective Unconscious in Operation
Sat., Feb. 10
10am-1pm

C.G. Jung’s perspective on the existence of a dynamic, multi-layered unconscious helps to distinguish among various kinds of unconscious products. This, in turn, helps us better to approach the mystery by which myth, fairy tale, folk tale, fantasy and dreams enrich and assist conscious life. The present talk will contrast, elaborate and distinguish between these various products with many examples, and a particular emphasis on myth and fairy tale. Participants will hopefully acquire a clearer, general sense of how each fits into both their creative and individuation journeys.

$30 IN ADVANCE for the series; $35 AT THE DOOR
Or register and pay by mail

Seminar

Graham Jackson
Dream Life
Sat., Mar. 3, 10, 24
10am-12pm

A look at Jung’s approach to the fascinating work of dream interpretation. Topics like subjective versus objective interpretation, traumatic dreams, prophetic dreams, recurring dreams, nightmares, among others, will be considered. Participants will work with dreams to see how Jung’s theories are applied. Dream motifs and symbols from their own dream life will also be examined.

$60 IN ADVANCE for the series; $25 AT THE DOOR for each seminar
Or register and pay by mail

 

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Play at 14 Elm

Cliona Dickie with the Toronto Irish Players
Little Gem
Fri., Mar. 16
7:30pm

Woman’s psychology is founded on the principle of Eros, the great binder and loosener, whereas from ancient times the ruling principle ascribed to man is Logos.
           (CW10, par 255.)

In the play Little Gem, we meet three women, mother, daughter, and grand-daughter, and observe how each experience love and relationship.  Within that milieu the play expresses a somewhat tenuous and changing connection to the masculine in stories of absent or reluctant father figures, a difficulty in maintaining control, and a new and emergent masculine energy to fill the gap of the father. The question of how these women hold the feminine Eros and maintain a relationship to the masculine is the problem of tension of the opposites. A discussion from the Jungian perspective will follow the performance.

MEMBERS: $20 IN ADVANCE OR AT THE DOOR
SUSTAINING MEMBERS: FREE
NON MEMBERS: $20 IN ADVANCE; $25 AT THE DOOR
Or register and pay by mail.

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Seminar

Mary Tomlinson
Projection
Sun., Apr. 8
10am-12:30pm

All that remains [in the Chariot] is the psychic content of projection.
           (CW 14, par. 263)
Jung used an alchemist’s Chariot as the vessel of psyche that traverses the transformative opus of individuation, withdrawing projections to arrive at the essence of one’s self. Some projection remains, perhaps illustrating the fundamental nature of projection to consciousness: from the newborn’s projection/introjection to mirror neurons to connect to the Other; through falling in love or hate; through Maya’s 10,000 things and the confrontation with the Shadow; from ‘participation mystique’ and identifying with the Archetype, to the basis of Good and Evil. Georgia O’Keeffe said, “You hung all your own associations with flowers onto my flower… as if I think and see what you think and see of the flower — and I don’t.”

$25 IN ADVANCE; $30 AT THE DOOR
Or register and pay by mail

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Seminar

Angela Pessinis
Zorba the Greek
Sat., May 5
10am-1:30pm

The 1964 Academy-Award-winning film, Zorba the Greek, is based on Nikos Kazantzakis’s semi-autobiographical novel of the same name. We will explore whether the young writer in his meeting with Zorba manages to befriend both body and psyche — what Kazantzakis referred to as “the two eternal enemies”. The two protagonists are presented as very different — almost opposite— sorts of characters: the intellectual buried in his books who writes about “the mysteries of the world”, and the simple but brave ‘ordinary’ man who engages with life full-heartedly, living those mysteries.
           With reference to Jung’s typology, shadow, anima and the individuation process, we will analyze what Zorba represents in the writer and vice versa. We will reflect on whether by the end of the film Zorba has succeeded in teaching the writer how “to love life and not to be afraid of death.”

Suggested reading: Nikos Kazantzakis: Zorba the Greek

$25 in advance, $30 AT THE DOOR
Or register and pay by mail

EVENTS IN HAMILTON, ONTARIO


Seminar in Hamilton

Jane Smith-Eivemark
The Way of Story
Wednesdays:
Sep. 27, Oct. 25,
Nov. 29, Dec. 13
CANCELLED
2-5pm

Helen Luke wrote these words on the value of stories: “It is in part by our response to the great stories of the world that we too can begin to find, each of us, the individual story, expressing the symbolic meaning behind the facts of our fate and behind the motives that determine the day-to-day choices of our lives.”

In short, myths and stories are an essential part of our human experience. Participants will both listen to and discuss Helen Luke’s audio work, The Way of Story: Myths and Stories for the Inner Life.

Minimum number of participants: 4. Maximum number of participants: 8


(N.B. The group requires 4 to run)
Participants must register for all sessions
.
CANCELLED


 

ONGOING COURSES, NO NEW REGISTRANTS ACCEPTED AT THIS TIME,
STARTING OCTOBER 2


Discussion Group

Margaret Meredith & Schuyler Brown
Jungian Reading Group
Mondays:
Oct. 2, Nov. 6, Dec. 4, Jan. 8, Feb. 5, Mar. 5, Apr. 2
15 Walmer Rd., Apt. 807
6-8pm

A continuing exploration of Jung’s The Red Book.

Free for members only-no new registrants accepted at this time.

 

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Locations and Maps

Arts and Letters Club 14 Elm Street, Toronto, OntarioArts and Letters Club:

Board Room, Studio, Lamps Room, 14 Elm St.:

  • Enter north side of Elm Street
  • Nearest subway stop: Dundas station at Yonge
  • Limited parking on both sides of Elm Street.
  • Greeters will direct you to the correct event space

Board Room, Bloor Street United Church, 300 Bloor St. W.:

  • Enter church, north side of Bloor Street, between Huron and Madison
  • Nearest subway stop: Spadina, on the Yonge-University-Spadina line
  • Parking on Madison, Huron and Bloor

3 Blackthorne Ave., Hamilton, Ontario:

  • accessible via QEW, 403 and Lincoln M. Alexander Pkwy

 

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